Day Off

Yesterday was my husband’s birthday.

We managed to find an extra day off so that we could stay on at the farm Monday instead of rushing home on the actual day of his celebration.

The celebration was quite formal (wink, wink).  I managed to avoid a shred of make up.  He had dirt and paint streaks on his old work shirt.  The kids presented him with a card involving a singing lizard.  Sunglasses were gifted and a pink and orange cake from Kroger ended the mealtime festivities.

I sat down late to write something profound or witty or at the very least interesting and found myself completely out of words.  In addition to three four year olds trapped inside because of the brutal heat, we had two cousins (one older, one younger) added to the mix.  I got nothing.  So happy Monday friends – hopefully I’ll have recovered tomorrow.

Fashion Friday: Career Hair

My favorite work colleague and I were walking back from lunch when she told me about an article she’d read.  Something about how your executive potential is limited if you wear your hair long.  She wondered, with her lovely long hair blowing in the wind, you think that is true?  Hmmm, I’m not sure, I responded.

I thought about all the executive women I knew.  I couldn’t think of any with long hair.  But then again, none of them were in their late 30s or early 40s.  I’ve experimented with my hair over time – going from very long when I married, to a fairly short inverted bob, to my fairly nondescript shoulder length style now.

So I decided to do some research.  Yes, it seems completely superficial, AND IT IS, but what goes in print?  Think about it.  During Hillary Clinton’s race, the media talked about her hairstyles and wardrobe.  It’s completely a double standard, but does long hair put you at a disadvantage if you’re trying to climb the career ladder?

Where do you start?  Well, I started with the Forbes 100 Most Powerful Women in the World.  I already knew I’d exclude any television/music types on the list because the corporate career rules don’t apply to them.  I also thought it would be interesting to see if there were universal rules versus the rules that apply to American corporate woman.

The first woman on their list was German Chancellor Angela Merkel who has short hair so there went my European theory.  The third woman on the list had long hair, and not to diminish the incredible work that she does (truly, she’s amazing), but it was Melinda Gates who came into her money through her husband’s career so I didn’t feel like I could count her as one who climbed to the top of the corporate ladder with long hair.  Weighing in at number 11 was South Korean President Park who also sports very short hair.

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At number 18, Marissa Mayer, CEO of Yahoo had about the longest hairstyle out of the top 25 (tied on length with the President of Argentina, Cristina Kirchner).

Here’s the women that made it to the Top Five:

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From top to bottom: Germany Chancellor Merkel, Federal Reserve Chair Janet Yellen, Philanthropist Melinda Gates, Brazilian President Dilma Rousseff, IMF Managing Director Christine Lagarde

Then I thought, well it’s age.  Most women tend to shorten their hair as they age.  What about young CEOs? So I looked at Forbes list of the Most Promising CEOs Under 35.  They listed 23 CEOs in different industries.  ZERO of them were women.  That’s right, absolutely not one promising young female CEO out there apparently.

So I settled in on The 25 Most Powerful Women CEOs list by CEO.com.  Aside from Maria das Gracas Silva, the CEO of Petrobras in Brazil, the only women CEOs with hair past their shoulders were in retail markets (Burberry, TJ Maxx).

I have no answer to this novel question about whether or not, even unconsciously by your evaluators, a hairstyle can impede your climb to the top, but I loved my friend’s perspective.  She said: We’re young.  Why don’t we change things?  We’ve got more than 20 years to stretch our career muscles and we should change things.  We should make sure that executive potential is never diminished over something as ridiculous as a hairstyle. 

I wholeheartedly agree (and spoken like one with oodles of executive promise).  First impressions absolutely count and, as you progress further in your career, you should make sure that your look exudes career potential.  That means looking polished, having a career wardrobe, and carrying yourself with confidence.  But I believe those exact principles apply to men.  Dressing for the job you want applies to any gender in a corporate environment.  Hopefully, as my friend and I move through our careers, short hair won’t be a prerequisite.

What say you?  What’s your take on a hairstyle impacting career potential?  We’re curious!

Merkel Photo Credit: AP Photo/Facundo Arrizabalaga
Yellen Photo Credit: JEWEL SAMAD/AFP/Getty Images
Gates Photo Credit: Frederic Courbet
Rousseff Photo Credit: Wiktor Dabkowski/ZUMAPRESS.com/Newscom
Lagarde Photo Credit: NICHOLAS KAMM/AFP/Getty Images
Mayer Photo Credit: Britta Pedersen/dpa/picture-alliance/Newscom

Wordless Wednesdays

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Stay Calm

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It’s one of the savviest pieces of leadership advice I’ve ever received: Stay Calm.

If you are called into leadership, or step into it willingly, you will find yourself battling a storm at some point.  A storm of failing public confidence.  A storm of economic decline.  A storm of naysayers when the ship changes course (even if a course correction was called for).

Storms come and a good leader weathers them calmly.  {===>Click to Tweet Even if she’s shaking inside, she conveys confidence.  Strength.  Control of the situation.

When I interviewed leaders around the country for my book, Learning to Lead, one of my favorite conversations was with Marina Park, CEO of Girl Scouts of Northern California.  She grew up racing sailboats with her father.  She recalled a particularly harrowing storm they found themselves battling on board their sailboat with the crew.  Even though some on the boat were injured, her father calmly called out orders and engendered both respect and action from those around him which enabled them to weather the storm and save the boat and the crew.

After sharing her real life storm experience, Ms. Park advised:

No one will have faith in a leader who is fearful, chaotic or panicked in the midst of a crisis.  The reality is, the leader must do what has to be done and give people the confidence that you know what is going on and the ship is not sinking.  You must cultivate the ability to settle people down, focus on what needs to get done, and then do it.  Remaining calm will give those around you the confidence that you are in control and things will turn out okay, and that in turn will engender action and trust. 

It’s not easy.  Particularly when, even from the leadership vantage point, you’re not sure what is over the next wave.  But panic will definitely not move you forward.  It will cause confusion and will prevent those supporting you from trusting you with the decision to chart the right course.

So take a deep breath.  Focus on the very next move.  And stay calm.

Photo Credit: Eric Kilby

What Are You Afraid Of?

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What are you afraid of?

What is holding you back?

What turns your skin cold?

I have to tell you, I am scared to death.

I am scared of my dream failing.  I’m at least equally as scared that my dream might succeed.

I am scared of disobeying God.  I’m just about as scared of obedience given some of the things He is asking me to do.

I have generational fear.  It goes way back.  In fact, my fear is actually not as acute as the women who have gone before me.  Women of faith.  Yet women often paralyzed by fear.  But this is what I know in the deepest core of my being:

God is love. Whoever lives in love lives in God, and God in them. This is how love is made complete among us so that we will have confidence on the day of judgment: In this world we are like Jesus.  There is no fear in love. But perfect love drives out fear, because fear has to do with punishment. The one who fears is not made perfect in loveI John 4:16-18

So do not fear, for I am with you; do not be dismayed, for I am your God.  I will strengthen you and help you; I will uphold you with my righteous right hand Isaiah 41:10

Please join me over at God-sized Dreams today to read the rest of the story.